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Our Lady of the Angels (OLA) School Fire, December 1, 1958





The Alamo Theater
(pdf)
(Contributed by Connie Straube)

Here is a picture of a parade going west on North Avenue in '56 or '57. These are the Northwest Lions Little League Teams, which included kids from OLA. The Tiffin Theatre is visible in the backround. (Photo courtesy of Jerry Kasper) Here is a picture of a parade going west on North Avenue in '56 or '57. These are the Northwest Lions Little League Teams, which included kids from OLA. The Tiffin Theatre is visible in the backround. (Photo courtesy of Jerry Kasper) Chicago billionaire-to-be Jim Moran appeared on the March 24, 1961 issue of Time Magazine. Moran was the owner of “Courtesy Ford”, the world's largest Ford dealership, and the only car dealer to ever appear on the cover of Time. While building his empire in the mid-1950s, he became the first Chicago car dealer to advertise on television, and following the OLA fire, he started a fund to help pay the medical expenses of children injured in the fire. His initial donation to the fund was $15,000. Later, he also contributed funds to help rebuild the OLA school. (Photo courtesy of Jerry Kasper) Jim Moran's Chicago dealership, “Courtesy Ford” in the mid-1950s. (Photo courtesy of Jerry Kasper)
Parade in front of The Tiffin Theatre Larger Version Jim Moran, March 24, 1961 Jim Moran Dealership
This is a 1946 newspaper movie listing, typical of such listing all through the 40s, 50s, and 60s, for the numerous single-screen theaters that dotted Chicagoland in those days. (Photo courtesy of Jerry Kasper) An early form of “frequent shopper card” from The Record Center, a popular Chicago music store in the 50s, 60s and 70s.(Photo courtesy of Jerry Kasper) Sky-Hi Drive-In and Restaurant, “Chicago's All-Electric Restaurant In The Air” (everything was electric, including heating and cooking). The brain-child of the Dimas brothers, Jim, John and Chris, the restaurant featured unique dining inside the cabin of a stripped DC-7, supported over a building housing the kitchen and a take-out counter. The restaurant opened on Cicero Avenue in 1964 with a staff of 22. (Photo courtesy of Jerry Kasper) Exterior view of the Ski-Hi Drive-In on Cicero Avenue in 1964. (Photo courtesy of Jerry Kasper)
1946 Movie Listings Record Center Punch Card Ski-Hi Drive-In Sky-Hi Drive-In
This is the sweets shop next door to the Tiffin Theater in Chicago. (Photo courtesy of Jerry Kasper) This Turtle Wax ad figure was located atop a building on south Ashland Avenue in the 1940s and 1950s.(Photo courtesy of Jerry Kasper) Future nostalgia ... Jay Pritzker Pavilion at Millenium Park in downtown Chicago. (Photo courtesy of Connie Straube) Jay Pritzker Pavilion at Millenium Park in downtown Chicago. (Photo courtesy of Connie Straube)
Sweets Shop Turtle Wax Jay Pritzker Pavilion 1 Jay Pritzker Pavilion 2
Jay Pritzker Pavilion at Millenium Park in downtown Chicago. (Photo courtesy of Connie Straube) This is the main gate of Chicago's Riverview Amusement Park in the late fifties or early sixties. The park was bordered by Western and Belmont Avenues, the Chicago River and Lane Tech High School. (Photo courtesy of Jerry Kasper) This is the Olson Rug waterfall, date unknown. (Photo courtesy of Jerry Kasper) Pope John Paul II's motorcade during his historic visit to Chicago in 1979. (Photo courtesy of John Sullivan)
Jay Pritzker Pavilion 3 Riverview Amusement Park Olson Rugs “Waterfall” Pope John Paul II - 1
Pope John Paul II's motorcade during his historic visit to Chicago in 1979. (Photo courtesy of John Sullivan) Pope John Paul II's motorcade during his historic visit to Chicago in 1979. (Photo courtesy of John Sullivan) Pope John Paul II's motorcade during his historic visit to Chicago in 1979. (Photo courtesy of John Sullivan) Night view of State Street in Chicago in 1967 (Photo courtesy of Jerry Kasper)
Pope John Paul II - 2 Pope John Paul II - 3 Pope John Paul II - 4 1967 Night view of State Street
Looking north on State Street in Chicago in the 1960s (Photo courtesy of Jerry Kasper) Even in 1967 traffic in Chicago was heavy at times (Photo courtesy of Jerry Kasper) Route 65 bus at Pulaski & Grand in 1967 (Photo courtesy of Jerry Kasper) Route 65 bus at Pulaski & Grand in 1972 (Photo courtesy of Jerry Kasper)
1960s Busy State Street 1967 Chicago Traffic Pulaski & Grand in 1967 Pulaski & Grand in 1972
Route 53 bus at Pulaski & Grand in 1972 (Photo courtesy of Jerry Kasper) The Buffalo Soda Fountain on the northwest corner of W. Irving Park Road and N. Pulaski Road in Chicago (date unknown). Today, there's a gas station on this site. (Photo courtesy of Jerry Kasper) The Waterfall at Olsen Rugs at Pulaski & Diversey in the 1960s. (Photo courtesy of Jerry Kasper) Ferndell Restaurant at North & Pulaski in the late 1960s or early 1970s. (Photo courtesy of Jerry Kasper)
Pulaski & Grand in 1972 Buffalo Soda Fountain Olsen Rugs 1960s Ferndell Restaurant in 1960s
The little record shop, called The Record Center, was next to the Pioneer Bank, at right in this photo. (Photo courtesy of Jerry Kasper) Lyrics to the song “Here Come the Hawks.” (Courtesy of Jerry Kasper) Illinois license plates 1950-59. (Photo courtesy of Jerry Kasper) Illinois license plates 1960-69. (Photo courtesy of Jerry Kasper)
The Record Center “Here Come the Hawks” Lyrics Illinois Plates 1950-59 Illinois Plates 1960-69
Remember Buffalo Bob, Howdy Doody and Clarabell the Clown? (Photo courtesy of Jerry Kasper) The Red Skelton TV Show premiered in September 1951, and was one of the first variety shows to successful transition from radio to TV, and became one of the longest running variety shows. Skelton's radio show continued for the first two years of the TV show. (Photo courtesy of Jerry Kasper) The Captain Kangaroo TV show ran from 1955 through 1986. Captain Kangaroo, aka Bob Keeshan, was the original Clarabell the Clown on the Howdy Doody Show. (Photo courtesy of Jerry Kasper) The Lone Ranger TV show aired from 1949 until 1957. (Photo courtesy of Jerry Kasper)
Howdy Doody Show Red Skelton Captain Kangaroo Lone Ranger
Dick “Two Ton” Baker was a local radio and TV personality whose popular shows, including several children's shows, ran on local Chicago stations for many years. (Photo courtesy of Jerry Kasper) Anyone who grew up in Chicago in the 1950s no doubt remembers “Uncle Johnny” Coons. He was another Chicago radio entertainer who made a successful transition to TV. His noon-time TV shows (“Noontime Comics” and “King Calico”) ran from 1952 to 1959, and were extremely popular with kids. (Photo courtesy of Jerry Kasper) Remember the test pattern that stations ran after they signed off for the day, and before they signed on? (Photo courtesy of Jerry Kasper) This was a race car sponsored by Jimmy's Hot Dogs (Photo courtesy of Jerry Kasper)
Two-Ton Baker Uncle Johnny TV Test Pattern Jimmy's Race Car
Skip's Fiesta Drive-In was the Chicago version of the American Grafitti drive-in burger joint. (Photo courtesy of Jerry Kasper) Skip's Fiesta Drive In, on North Avenue in Melrose Park. This pictures is from sometime in the 1970s, but in its heyday in the 1950s, Skip's was a bustling hangout for area teenagers. (Photo courtesy of Jerry Kasper)
Skip's Fiesta Drive In 1 Skip's Fiesta Drive In 2



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